Story about parallel reality

Let me tell you a story about parallel reality. In parallel reality, many things are the same as in our familiar reality, but some things are a little bit, and sometimes a lot, different. I will use myself as an example citizen of this parallel world and tell you about a normal day in that parallel life.

I wake up my daughters, who are six and three, get through the morning routines and tell them to climb on the roof of my car to wait. By the time I get to the car, the girls are already on top of it, waiting for me to open the sunroof to let them get in. For decades, our cars have had statutory roof access except, of course, for those who need to use the conventional means of access.

I wake up in the morning to my alarm as usual and climb down from my loft bed. I roll my shoulders a couple of times to warm up as I’ve decided to swing myself to the bathroom this morning, using the bars on the ceiling. Most mornings I opt for the balancing and stepping track at floor level. On an upbeat day I move around my flat using the sturdy handles, rails, stairs and steps placed throughout the space. We have taken a reverse view on accessibility and made sure that moving from A to B is as difficult as possible. And what’s best, most of the normal furniture is fully integrated into an obstacle course within our home.

I drop the girls off at the kindergarten, and both of them quickly enter the building through their own hatches. I choose the adult door, although I sometimes enjoy challenging myself by using their much smaller entrances. I drive to work, where I climb over the mandatory high doorstep. For this morning, I choose the standing desk but in the afternoons I tend to work on one of the mobile workstations in our open-plan office and move it around to suit my liking, or I climb on top of the thinking loft.

After a busy day at work, my wife and I sit in front of the TV. We have five TV screens at home and the programme we are watching switches from one screen to the next every 10 to 20 minutes, just like in any normal middle-class household these days. It is the second day of the Olympics and we are watching an indoor ballgame match between Finland and France. In the indoor ballgame, the court is indoors but otherwise the equipment or the size or shape of the court or ball has not been determined. Each team are notified of the specific details and rules of the game two weeks in advance. This time, the court is at a 15-degree angle and it has raised platforms varying between 30 cm and 1.5 metres in height. The “’ball” is in fact a cube made of wood and coated with rubber. There are five players in each team and the goal is a 30 cm hole in the ground. The concept team for the Olympics has done a good job this year and I look forward to the other events, such as the short and long track events, random tasks and expression sport. 

Finland is clearly the better team this time and beats France 5–3, setting the games off to a good start. Having calmed down from the excitement of the game, we eat a light evening snack and I get the girls off to bed, which are little sleeping pods placed near the ceiling. Before hitting the sack myself, I do a few releasing stretches and climb up to bed for a well-earned sleep.

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Jaakko Junttila
Jaakko Junttila
Parkour Instructor - Photo by: Eero Kauppinen
Parkour Academy
www.parkourakatemia.fi
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